Rebelliousness Essay Contest

Awards
2018 High School Essay Contest

Topic: “Why do we — as consumers of media — need to obtain news from multiple feeds and not just one or two outlets?”

2017 Contest Winners
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First Place National Essay Winner
($1,000 scholarship)
Lauryn Wu, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, Virginia
Read essay [PDF]

— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Co-winner: Aliza Diepenbrock, Spring Street International School, Friday Harbor, Washington
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— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Co-winner: Carolyn Harper, Bob Jones High School, Madison, Alabama
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— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Eileen Yang, Peddie School, Hightstown, New Jersey
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Resources for scholastic journalists and educators

JEA Digital Media Resources
Multimedia Tools
Guide to Broadcast/Video
Guide to Moving Online


Previous honorees

2016 Contest Winners

— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Simon Levien, Sparta High School, Sparta, N.J.
Read essay [PDF]
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: David Oks, The Masters School, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.
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— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Christine Condon, Dulaney High School, Timonium, Md.
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2015 Contest Winners

— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Matthew Zipf, Richard Montgomery High School, Rockville, Md.
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— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Philip Kim, Paramus High School, Paramus, N.J.
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— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Sania Chandrani, Parkview High School, Liburn, Ga.
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2014 Contest Winners

— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Tianyu Lin of Milton Academy in Milton, Mass.
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— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Phoebe Fox of La Pietra Hawaii School for Girls in Honolulu, Hawaii
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— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Jacob Bloch of Paul D. Schreiber High School in Port Washington, N.Y.
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2013 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Courtney Swafford of Write from the Heart in Wilmington, Del.
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— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Anran Yu of Desert Vista High School in Phoenix, Ariz.
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— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Chuli Zeng of Woodbridge High School in Irvine, Calif.
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2012 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Hwasung (Daniel) Yoo of Maggie L. Walker Governor's School for Government and International Studies in Richmond, Va.
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— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Niisackey Mills of South Plainfield High School in South Plainfield, N.J.
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— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Dustin Chandler of East Burke High School in Connellys Springs, N.C.
Read essay [PDF]


2011 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Emerson Hardebeck of Timberline High School in Lacey, Wash.
Read essay [PDF, 139 KB]
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Shaun Moran of St. Augustine Prep School in Richland, N.J.
Read essay [PDF, 78 KB]
— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Chris Papas of Oakton High School in Vienna, Va. Read essay [PDF, 74 KB]


2010 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Erin McDonough of Bishop O’Connell High School in Arlington, Va.
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Shaj Mathew of Huntingtown High School in Huntingtown, Md.
— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Xiaonan “April” Hu of Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Va.


2009 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Alix Cohen of Cypress Bay High School, Weston, Fla.
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Victor Hollenberg of Staples High School, Westport, Conn.
— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Alyssa Patrick of Eisenhower High School, Yakima, Wash.


2008 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Mark Brouch, Aurora Central Catholic High School, Aurora, Ill.
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Evan Rich, Jericho High School, Jericho, N.Y.
— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Danna Seligman, Newbury Park High School, Newbury Park, Ca.


2007 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): David Kelly, Broomfield High School, Broomfield, Colo.
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Dan Garon, Robbinsdale Armstrong High School, Plymouth, Minn.
— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Erin Gowdy, Bob Jones High School, Madison, Ala.


2006 Contest Winners
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— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship): Angelika Zych, Vanguard High School, in Ocala, Fla.
— Second Place, $500 Scholarship Winner: Jonathan Homrighausen of Sunnyside High School in Sunnyside, Wash.
— Third Place, $300 Scholarship Winner: Amy Brooks of Clayton High School in Clayton, Mo.


2005 Contest Winners
— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship winner) : Mindy Zhang, Robinson Secondary School, Fairfax, Va.
— Second Place ($500 scholarship winner): Zachory John Drisko, Green Hope High School, Cary, N.C.
— Third Place ($300 scholarship winner): Katie Roberts, Home schooled, Walnut Shade, Mo.


2004 Contest Winners
— First Place National Essay Winner ($1,000 scholarship winner): Heather Hamilton, Sentinel High School, Missoula, Mont.
— Second Place ($500 scholarship winner): Logan Oyler, Hickory High School, Chesapeake, Va.
— Third Place ($300 scholarship winner): Joey Muffler, Bishop Ireton High School Alexandria, VA


2002 National First Place Winner
Jonathan Ross Kaplan, Nova High School, Davie, Fla.

2000 National First Place Winner
Katie Pennock, West Henderson High School, Hendersonville, NC

1999 National First Place Winner
Darcy Colson Baxter, Lansing Central High School (near Ithaca, N.Y.)

1998 National First Place Winner
Michael Anthony Fedele III, Northwestern High School, Rock Hill, S.C.

Postmark deadline: February 23, 2018

Nominations accepted beginning November 3, 2017

The Sigma Delta Chi Foundation of the Society of Professional Journalists and the Journalism Education Association want to increase high school students’ knowledge and understanding of the importance of independent media to our lives. National winners of this essay contest receive scholarship awards.

Award recognition

First Place: $1,000 scholarship
Second Place: $500 scholarship
Third Place: $300 scholarship

Entry Deadline

All entries should be postmarked by February 23, 2018.


Complete Official Rules and How to Enter

For official contest rules and information on how to enter this year’s High School Essay Contest, please visit this link.

Perspectives.

Sharing stories, ideas, and viewpoints. 

At Harvard GlobalWE, we seek to explore and represent diverse experiences, ideas and perspectives on issues relating to global women's empowerment. In our Perspectives section, we will be publishing essays written by GlobalWE members, as well as other contributors who can illuminate our understanding of issues facing women in various parts of the world today. Over time, we hope our Perspectives section becomes an anthology of stories and essays representing both the diversity of experience and commonality of commitment to global women's empowerment. Please note that some stories and essays will be published anonomously to protect the privacy of the author and those of whom they write.

 

Harvard GlobalWE Essay Contest: In 2015, we launched our first annual essay contest for high school students. Please visit our Harvard GlobalWE Essay Contest Page to learn about our global contest and read select essays from our first contest in Islamabad, Pakistan.


Volume 1, Fall 2015


Choice as Empowerment.

A personal essay by a Harvard GlobalWE Co-Founder


My mother was a pioneer, the only woman in her law school class, an elected judge, the first woman president of her state’s Judges Association, and the first woman chairperson of the National Conference of State Trial Judges.  When I decided to leave my job at a large law firm to spend time with my first-born son, she could not understand my choice.  Why had she worked so hard to break the glass ceiling for future generations, only to see her own daughter abandon paid work? Over time, she tempered that judgment. When I presented her with grandchildren, and as they grew, she occasionally complimented me on my choice to work from home. 

Still, she knew for sure that she had made the right choice for herself, for two reasons.  First, my mother grew up in an era when a female choosing to strive for a high powered career was a revolutionary, and my mother had a rebellious personality. She was a tomboy, the youngest in her family, with an older brother who might have outshone her if she had allowed it. Her own mother, Mildred, my grandmother, had excelled in school and wanted to attend college, but had been denied the opportunity by her beloved father, Michael, and a culture that thought college for women unseemly. 

My mother also had a personal a story that gave rise to her career devotion.  My mother, her mother Mildred, her father Jack, and her brother lived in the same brownstone as Mildred's parents, Michael and Rose.  When my mother was 11 years old, her grandfather Michael developed cancer.  One morning, as Jack went to sit by his dying father-in-law’s bedside, Jack suffered a stroke and lost his own life. Mildred lost her husband and father on the same day, one death expected and one a sudden shock.  She gathered her children together on her bed and wailed: “What will we do; how will we survive?"  The subtext was how will we survive without men to provide for us?  My 11 year old mother lost her father and her grandfather that day, and also her sense of security.  She learned the importance of education, paid employment, and being able to provide for herself and her family.  She wanted that security for me. 

But I had my own story.  My brother died when I was twelve, an unexpected and shocking event that split my life into two pieces, “before” and “after."  When my first child was born many years later, my own story was my guide.  My husband had a well-paying job and I faced a choice.  I could be home with my new child, or pay for child care and go back to work at my law firm. I felt keenly the impermanence of life, and what I wanted most for myself was more time with loved ones. For me, the choice to work from home fit the needs and goals of my family and satisfied the call of my personal story.  

Freedom to choose is empowerment. My mother and I were able to make choices that suited our own goals and stories.  I wish the same for other women around the world. Freedom to dress as we wish, to speak up as we desire, to travel where we'd like to go, to drive ourselves, to educate our daughters, to work or to be home with children.  I helped establish Harvard GlobalWe to gather Harvard alumni, men and women, from around the world to examine social structures, economic circumstances, governments, and cultures that limit or enhance these choices.  We are dedicated to the empowerment of women through education, dialogue, and connection among individuals working for women’s rights.  We hope you will bring your own stories and goals, and join us.  


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